Second Life of a Hungarian SharePoint Geek

October 16, 2017

Editing the PWS Site Address does not work if the URL is very long

Filed under: Bugs, PowerShell, Project Server — Tags: , , — Peter Holpar @ 19:52

As part of our daily jobs, we should rename projects on our Project Server occasionally. For this kind of change, we have already a “human workflow” or a check list: tasks, we should perform one after another.

The Standard Process

These steps include:

1. Changing the project name on the Project Details page:

image

2. Setting the project web site (PWS) title and URL on the Title, Description, and Logo page of Site Settings:

image

(Note, there is a bug already on this page. If the URL is long enough, it is displayed duplicated in the path under URL name, once in the fix part, and once in the text box. It is already part of the example URL bottom on the left as well. See the screenshot above.)

3. Re-binding the project to the relocated PWS via the PWA Settings / Connected SharePoint Sites / Edit Address.
(For more information, see The Edit Site Address settings on this page)

image

image

image

4. Beyond the steps described above we have some extra steps, like renaming project groups, setting further PWS properties, and so on, but these steps are all custom to our current solution.

The Problem

A few month ago one of the Project Server administrators complained that he is not able to change the site address of  PWS. He was to change the URL from (let’s say) VeryVeryLongProjectSiteUrl to VeryVeryLongProjectSiteUrlNew. Although he has not got any error message, and I’ve not found any related entry in the ULS logs either, the original URL of the PWS remained unchanged.

Changing the Site Address via PSI and PowerShell

First, I wrote a PowerShell script that uses the PSI to change the PWS binding via the UpdateProjectWorkspaceAddress method.

  1. $pwsCurrentUrl = "http://YourProjectServer/PWA/VeryVeryLongProjectSiteUrl"
  2. $projUrl = "PWA/VeryVeryLongProjectSiteUrlNew" # that is the destination URL of the PWS, it should be the server relative URL, including PWA in the path!
  3.  
  4. $web = Get-SPWeb $pwsCurrentUrl
  5.  
  6. # if you already know the IDs (project ID and site ID of the PWA site)
  7. # $projId = [Guid]"99894c16-7a03-e411-83c6-005056b45654"
  8. # $siteId = [Guid]"e1b9fba5-09ad-441a-8679-6286dde059ab"
  9.  
  10. # or get the IDs from the PWS properties
  11. $projId = $web.AllProperties["MSPWAPROJUID"]
  12. $siteId = $web.Site.Id
  13.  
  14. # figure out the PWA url dinamically
  15. # $pwaUrl = $web.AllProperties["PWAURL"] # or
  16. $pwaUrl = $web.Site.Url
  17.  
  18. # we are using the Project PSI service
  19. $svcPath = "/_vti_bin/psi/Project.asmx?wsdl"
  20.  
  21. # https://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/scriptcenter/en-US/9d0d73bb-b2bf-4528-beea-321cf82a9b89/problem-executing-a-script-what-uses-namespace-parameter-in-the-newwebserviceproxy-cmdlet
  22. If ($global:svcPSProxy -eq $null)
  23. {
  24.   Write-Host "Connecting PSI proxy at $pwaUrl …"
  25.   $global:svcPSProxy = New-WebServiceProxy -Namespace PSIProxy -Uri ($pwaUrl + $svcPath) -UseDefaultCredential
  26. }
  27. Else
  28. {
  29.   Write-Host "Reusing existing PSI proxy"
  30. }
  31.  
  32. # change the project – PWS binding, or create a new PWS if there is no PWS at the destination
  33. $svcPSProxy.UpdateProjectWorkspaceAddress($projId, $projUrl, $siteId)

Note, that based on my tests, the script not only maps an existing PWS to the project, but it creates a new PWS if there is no PWS at the destination URL specified.

Finding the Bug on the Web Page

After completing the task via the script above, I decided to find out the reason, the UI does not work in this case.

As far as I see, it is a simple silly error in the JavaScript on the Edit Site Address page (\TEMPLATE\LAYOUTS\PWA\ADMIN\EditSiteAddressDlg.aspx).

It is the Init function on that page:

  1. function Init()
  2. {ULSH9J:;
  3.    oArgs = window.frameElement.dialogArgs;
  4.    sProjName = oArgs.sProjName;
  5.    sServerAddr = ((oArgs.sServerAddr != null) ? oArgs.sServerAddr : "");
  6.    sSubwebName = oArgs.sSubwebName;
  7.  
  8.    idProjectNameTD.title = sProjName;
  9.    if(sProjName.length > 40)
  10.    {
  11.       sProjName = sProjName.slice(0,40) + "…";
  12.    }
  13.    XUI.Html.SetText(idProjectNameTD, sProjName);
  14.  
  15.    if((sServerAddr != "") && (sSubwebName != ""))
  16.    {
  17.       var sUrl = sServerAddr + "/" + sSubwebName;
  18.       idServerAddressTD.title = sUrl;
  19.       if(sUrl.length > 40)
  20.       {
  21.          sUrl = sUrl.slice(0,40) + "…";
  22.       }
  23.       XUI.Html.SetText(idServerAddressTD, sUrl);
  24.    }
  25.  
  26.    idSubwebName.value = sSubwebName;
  27.  
  28.    RecalculateTargetURL();
  29.  
  30.    origTargetUrl = XUI.Html.GetText(idTargetURL);
  31. }

This function invokes the RecalculateTargetURL function (see below) to trim the end of the URL of the PWS if it is longer then 50 characters, and to append … to it. This value is displayed then on the page as Destination URL. In the Init function we store the original value in the origTargetUrl variable.

  1. function RecalculateTargetURL()
  2. {ULSH9J:;
  3.    var sURL = idVirtualServerDropdown[idVirtualServerDropdown.selectedIndex].text;
  4.    sURL += "/" + TrimSpaces(idSubwebName.value);
  5.  
  6.    idTargetURL.title = sURL;
  7.  
  8.    if(sURL.length > 50)
  9.    {
  10.       sURL = sURL.slice(0,50) + "…";
  11.    }
  12.  
  13.    XUI.Html.SetText(idTargetURL, sURL);
  14. }

image

The very same RecalculateTargetURL function is invoked on each key press or on changes in the Site URL text box to keep the value of the Destination URL on the page current:

<input DIR="ltr" type="text" id="idSubwebName" name="idSubwebName" style="width: 160px" onchange="RecalculateTargetURL()" onkeyup="RecalculateTargetURL()" …

Note, that the RecalculateTargetURL function is registered for the onchange event of Web Application dropdown either.

The problem is, that the script uses the trimmed values for comparison in the OkBtn_OnClick function (see the method below, including some server side code) to decide, if there is any change in the URL (see the condition with the comment “If nothing changed then we don’t have to do anything” below). Of course, if you have long site (and project) names, and you change something only at the end of the name, this comparison won’t detect the change.

  1. function OkBtn_OnClick()
  2. {ULSH9J:;
  3.    if(idSiteEnabled.checked && (TrimSpaces(idSubwebName.value) == ""))
  4.    {
  5.       XUI.Html.SetText(idAlertBox, PJUnescape("<%=PJEscape(PJUtility.GetLocalizedString(IDS.ADMIN_EDITSITEADDRESSDLG_WEB_NAME_BLANK_ALERT))%>"));
  6.       XUI.Html.SetText(idRequiredFieldIndicator, "*");
  7.       idSubwebName.focus();
  8.       return;
  9.    }
  10.    
  11.    // If nothing changed then we don't have to do anything.
  12.    if((origTargetUrl == XUI.Html.GetText(idTargetURL)) && !idSiteNotEnabled.checked)
  13.    {
  14.       window.frameElement.commonModalDialogClose(0, null);
  15.       return;
  16.    }
  17.    //if we remove the site
  18.    else if(idSiteNotEnabled.checked)
  19.    {
  20.       idSubwebName.value = "";
  21.       oArgs.sNewSubwebName = "";
  22.       oArgs.sNewServerUID = "<%=Guid.Empty%>";
  23.    }
  24.    //we change the site
  25.    else
  26.    {
  27.       oArgs.sNewServerUID = idVirtualServerDropdown[idVirtualServerDropdown.selectedIndex].value;
  28.       var sTemp = TrimSpaces(idSubwebName.value);
  29.  
  30.       // Remove the trailing slash.
  31.       if(sTemp.charAt(sTemp.length – 1) == '/')
  32.       {
  33.          sTemp = sTemp.substr(0, sTemp.length – 1);
  34.       }
  35.       oArgs.sNewSubwebName  = sTemp;
  36.       window.returnValue    = true;
  37.    }
  38.  
  39.    window.frameElement.commonModalDialogClose(1, oArgs);
  40. }

Note however, that if you click on the Test URL button, a new browser tab would be opened with the right destination URL (and not the trimmed one). The right new URL is displayed as a tooltip as well, when you move the mouse pointer over the URL right to the Destination URL title.

function TestUrl_OnClick(event)
{ULSH9J:;
   window.open(idTargetURL.title);
}

As you can see, the TestUrl_OnClick function uses the tooltip of the Destination URL (idTargetURL.title) to open the site. It is important to point out, that the value of  idTargetURL.title is set to the full URL, and not to the trimmed one in the RecalculateTargetURL function (see above).

image

A Quick Workaround via the Web Page

If you don’t want (or not allowed) to use the PowerShell script above to relocate your PWS, there is a simple workaround that uses the standard web admin UI. Start the F12 Developer Tools in Internet Explorer, and set a breakpoint on the line

if((origTargetUrl == XUI.Html.GetText(idTargetURL)) && !idSiteNotEnabled.checked)

on the Edit Site Address page. If the breakpoint get hit, jump over the condition by setting the next statement of execution direct onto the line:

oArgs.sNewServerUID = idVirtualServerDropdown[idVirtualServerDropdown.selectedIndex].value;

The Long-Term (but Dirty) Solution

Although it is not supported, you can change the code in the EditSiteAddressDlg.aspx page as well. I strongly suggest you to take a backup of this file first.

There are two options to fix the error, the first one is to modify the Init function to save the original full (!) URL instead of the trimmed one:

//origTargetUrl = XUI.Html.GetText(idTargetURL);
origTargetUrl = idTargetURL.title;

Then use this value to compare with the current untrimmed URL value in the OkBtn_OnClick function:

// If nothing changed then we don’t have to do anything.
//if((origTargetUrl == XUI.Html.GetText(idTargetURL)) && !idSiteNotEnabled.checked)
if((origTargetUrl == idTargetURL.title) && !idSiteNotEnabled.checked)

The other option is to forget origTargetUrl, and take the original full URL from the tooltip of the Current site address. As you can see on the screenshot after the RecalculateTargetURL function code snippet above, this tooltip contains the untrimmed URL version.

In this case, the new comparison in the OkBtn_OnClick function:

if((idServerAddressTD.title == idTargetURL.title) && !idSiteNotEnabled.checked)

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How to query your working hours from Windows Event Log via PowerShell

Filed under: Tips & Tricks, PowerShell — Tags: , — Peter Holpar @ 19:49

At my company we have a kind of time reporting application. If I book the activities the same day, there is no problem. But after a week, it is not always straightforward to remember what I exactly did on a given day. To have a rough estimate, how many hours I overall and separated for projects worked, I usually make use of data sources like Event Viewer (first and last entries daily in the Windows Logs / System), Exchange (mails sent and receive), Internet Explore (sites visited in Browser History) and TFS (check-ins and task history).

To be able to query the Event Viewer Logs without starting the application and browsing through the entries, I wrote a PowerShell script that perform these tasks automatically for me. It’s nothing extra, but I thought it might be useful for others as well:

$startDay = Get-Date -Date ‘2017/09/01’
$endDay = Get-Date -Date ‘2017/09/11’

$days = New-Object System.Collections.Generic.List“1[System.DateTime]
For ($today = $startDay; $today -le $endDay; $today = $today.AddDays(1)) {
  $days.Add($today)
}

$days | % {
  $day = $_
  $events = Get-EventLog -Log System | ? { $_.TimeGenerated.Date -eq $day.Date }
  $maxDate = ($events | Measure-Object -Property TimeGenerated -Maximum).Maximum
  $minDate = ($events | Measure-Object -Property TimeGenerated -Minimum).Minimum
  select -Input $_ -Prop `
    @{ Name=’Day’; Expression={$day.ToShortDateString()} },
    @{ Name=’From’; Expression={ $minDate.ToLongTimeString() } },
    @{ Name=’To’; Expression={ $maxDate.ToLongTimeString() } },
    @{ Name=’Working Hours’; Expression={ $maxDate – $minDate } }
} | Export-Csv -Path C:\Temp\TimeReport.csv -Delimiter ";" -Encoding UTF8 -NoTypeInformation

The script writes the results in a .csv file, but without the last part (Export-Csv) you can direct the output to the screen as well.

September 9, 2017

Approving all pending documents (and folders) of a specified library using PowerShell on the Client Side

Filed under: Managed Client OM, PowerShell, SP 2013 — Tags: , , — Peter Holpar @ 07:00

A few years ago I already wrote about how to approve all pending document in a document library via PowerShell. That time I achieved that using the server side object model of SharePoint. Recently we had a situation, where we were not allowed to log on the server, so we had to do the approval from the client side. To achieve that, I’ve adapted the script to the requirements of the client object model.

Here is the result:

  1. $url = "http://YourSharePointServer/Web/SubWeb&quot;
  2.  
  3. # set path according to your current configuration
  4. Add-Type -Path "c:\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\Web Server Extensions\15\ISAPI\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.Runtime.dll"
  5. Add-Type -Path "c:\Program Files\Common Files\microsoft shared\Web Server Extensions\15\ISAPI\Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.dll"
  6.  
  7.  
  8. # set credentials, if the current credentials would not be appropriate
  9. #$domain = "YourDomain"
  10. #$userName = "YourUserName"
  11. #$pwd = Read-Host -Prompt ("Enter password for $domain\$userName") -AsSecureString
  12. #$credentials = New-Object System.Net.NetworkCredential($userName, $pwd, $domain);
  13.  
  14. $ctx = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.ClientContext($url)
  15. #$ctx.Credentials  = $credentials
  16.  
  17. $web = $ctx.Web
  18.  
  19.  
  20. function approveItems($listTitle)  
  21. {
  22.   Write-Host Processing $listTitle
  23.   $list = $web.Lists.GetByTitle($listTitle)
  24.   $query = New-Object Microsoft.SharePoint.Client.CamlQuery
  25.   $query.ViewXml = "<View Scope = 'RecursiveAll'><ViewFields><FieldRef Name=\'Name\'/><FieldRef Name=\'_ModerationStatus\'/></ViewFields><Query><Where><Eq><FieldRef Name='_ModerationStatus' /><Value Type='ModStat'>2</Value></Eq></Where></Query></View>"
  26.   $items = $list.GetItems($query)
  27.   $ctx.Load($items)
  28.   $ctx.ExecuteQuery()
  29.  
  30.   $items | % {
  31.       Write-Host Approving:$_["FileLeafRef"]
  32.     $_["_ModerationStatus"] = 0
  33.     $_.Update()
  34.     # if you have an error "The request uses too many resources", call ExecuteQuery here
  35.     # $ctx.ExecuteQuery()
  36.   }
  37.  
  38.   $ctx.ExecuteQuery()
  39.   Write-Host —————————
  40. }
  41.  
  42. approveItems "TitleOfYourList"

The script assumes, that your current credentials allow you to perform the approval. If it would be not the case, you can comment out the section with credentials in the script, and read for the password of the user having permission to the task. I don’t suggest storing the password in the script.

If the library contains a lot of items waiting for approval, you may get an error message “The request uses too many resources” (see details here). In this case you should call the ExecuteQuery method in the loop for each item, instead of sending the request in a single batch.

July 20, 2017

How to Export a SharePoint List View to Excel Automatically Using PowerShell

Filed under: PowerShell, SP 2013, Tips & Tricks — Tags: , , — Peter Holpar @ 21:17

Note: This post is actually only a minor modification of the post I wrote recently about the URL of the Edit View page.

We can easily export the content of a SharePoint List View via the UI, simply by clicking the Export to Excel button on the ribbon:

image

You can achieve that automatically as well, for example from PowerShell.

Note: In the text below I describe the solution for a situation if you work locally on the server, but it is possible to apply the same technique to a remote solution as well, one should only transfer the code to the Managed Client Object Model.

Assume you have a list called YourList in a SharePoint site with URL http://YourSharePoint/Web/SubWeb.

It is easy to find out (for example, by monitoring the network traffic by Fiddler) that the URL generated when you click the Export to Excel button is like this:

http://YourSharePoint/Web/SubWeb/_vti_bin/owssvr.dll?CS=65001&Using=_layouts/15/query.iqy&List=%7B5315A0C9%2DAA6A%2D4598%2DA1D4%2D99B1BBCBF8C7%7D&View=%7B8E449E17%2D593C%2D4218%2DA4A4%2D43A8B47382BC%7D&RootFolder=%2FWeb%2FSubWeb%2FLists%2FYourList&CacheControl=1

The values of the List and View query string parameters are the encoded IDs of your list and list view respectively.

The following code generates the same URL from PowerShell:

$web = Get-SPWeb http://YourSharePoint/Web/SubWeb
$list = $web.Lists[‘YourList’]

# get the default view of the list
$view = $list.DefaultView
# or get an arbitrary view by its name
# $view = $list.Views[‘All Items’]
$viewId = $view.ID

function EscapeGuid($guid)
{
  return "{$guid}".ToUpper().Replace(‘-‘, ‘%2D’).Replace(‘{‘, ‘%7B’).Replace(‘}’, ‘%7D’)
}

$escapedListId = EscapeGuid $list.ID
$escapedViewId = EscapeGuid $view.ID
$escapedRootFolder = $list.RootFolder.ServerRelativeUrl.Replace(‘/’, ‘%2F’)

$url = $web.Url + "/_vti_bin/owssvr.dll?CS=65001&Using=_layouts/15/query.iqy&List=$escapedListId&View=$escapedViewId&RootFolder=$escapedRootFolder&CacheControl=1"

The URL above is actually no URL for the data or its schema, it’s a URL for a descriptor file (with the extension .iqy, see more about that here), that contains the URL for that list data and its schema.

The content of an .iqy file looks like this (you can capture it by Fiddler as well, or have a look at the content of the file we saved in our script further below) :

WEB
1
http://YourSharePoint/Web/SubWeb/_vti_bin/_vti_bin/owssvr.dll?XMLDATA=1&List={5315A0C9-AA6A-4598-A1D4-99B1BBCBF8C7}&View={8E449E17-593C-4218-A4A4-43A8B47382BC}&RowLimit=0&RootFolder=%2fWeb%2fSubWeb%2fLists%2fYourList

Selection={5315A0C9-AA6A-4598-A1D4-99B1BBCBF8C7}-{8E449E17-593C-4218-A4A4-43A8B47382BC}
EditWebPage=
Formatting=None
PreFormattedTextToColumns=True
ConsecutiveDelimitersAsOne=True
SingleBlockTextImport=False
DisableDateRecognition=False
DisableRedirections=False
SharePointApplication=http://YourSharePoint/Web/SubWeb/_vti_bin
SharePointListView={8E449E17-593C-4218-A4A4-43A8B47382BC}
SharePointListName={5315A0C9-AA6A-4598-A1D4-99B1BBCBF8C7}
RootFolder=/Web/SubWeb/Lists/YourList

The URL we have in line 3 refers to the endpoint that returns the data schema and the data itself.. Based on this information, Excel can import and display the data of the list view.

Let’s save the file from the URL of the .icq file we have already from the first script, and start Excel to open the list view data. The script below assumes the extension .iqy is associated with Excel in your system:

$path = "C:\temp\owssvr.iqy"

$request = [System.Net.WebRequest]::Create($url)
$request.UseDefaultCredentials = $true
$request.Accept = "text/html, application/xhtml+xml, */*"

$response = $request.GetResponse()
$reader = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader $response.GetResponseStream()
$data = $reader.ReadToEnd()

$writer = [System.IO.StreamWriter] $path
$writer.WriteLine($data)
$writer.Close()

# the .iqy file will be opened by Excel
Invoke-Expression $path
# optionally delete the file
# Remove-Item $path

July 9, 2017

Import-SPWeb: Failed to read package file

Filed under: PowerShell, SP 2013 — Tags: , — Peter Holpar @ 21:41

A few days ago I wanted to restore a SharePoint list (including data) on a development server via the Import-SPWeb cmdlet based on a backup created by the Export-SPWeb cmdlet in the productive farm:

$url = "http://YourSharePoint/Web/SubWeb&quot;
$filePath = "E:\Data\ListExport.cmp"

Import-SPWeb $url -Path $filePath

Surprisingly, I’ve received a “Failed to read package file” exception, although the same .cmp file could have been imported in the test farm, having the same SharePoint version as the development and productive systems using the same user and same permissions.

PS C:\Users\pholpar> Import-SPWeb $url -Path $filePath

Log file generated:
        E:\Data\ListExport.cmp.import.log

Import-SPWeb : Failed to read package file.
At line:1 char:1
+ Import-SPWeb $url -Path $filePath
+
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidData: (Microsoft.Share…CmdletImportWeb:
   SPCmdletImportWeb) [Import-SPWeb], SPException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell.SPCmdletImportWeb

image

Having a look into the generated log file, I found the next surprise in the inner exception: “Failure writing to target file”. Actually, I wanted to read the .cmp file, not to write, what’s the problem then with writing?

[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Start Time: 03.07.2017 21:03:28.
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Progress: Initializing Import.
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Error: Failure writing to target file
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Debug:    at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPGlobal.HandleComException(COMException comEx)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.Library.SPRequest.ExtractFilesFromCabinet(String bstrTempDirectory, String bstrCabFileLocation)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.<>c__DisplayClass5.<RunWithElevatedPrivileges>b__3()
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.Utilities.SecurityContext.RunAsProcess(CodeToRunElevated secureCode)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(WaitCallback secureCode, Object param)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(CodeToRunElevated secureCode)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.Deployment.ImportDataFileManager.Uncompress(SPRequest request)
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] FatalError: Failed to read package file.
*** Inner exception:
Failure writing to target file
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Debug:    at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPGlobal.HandleComException(COMException comEx)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.Library.SPRequest.ExtractFilesFromCabinet(String bstrTempDirectory, String bstrCabFileLocation)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.<>c__DisplayClass5.<RunWithElevatedPrivileges>b__3()
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.Utilities.SecurityContext.RunAsProcess(CodeToRunElevated secureCode)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(WaitCallback secureCode, Object param)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(CodeToRunElevated secureCode)
   at Microsoft.SharePoint.Deployment.ImportDataFileManager.Uncompress(SPRequest request)
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Progress: Import did not complete.
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Finish Time: 03.07.2017 21:03:28.
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Duration: 00:00:00
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Finished with 0 warnings.
[03.07.2017 21:03:28] Finished with 2 errors.

Checking the ULS logs provided me further details:

Entering BeginProcessing Method of Import-SPWeb.
Leaving BeginProcessing Method of Import-SPWeb.
Entering ProcessRecord Method of Import-SPWeb.
SecurityTokenServiceSendRequest: RemoteAddress: ‘
http://localhost:32843/SecurityTokenServiceApplication/securitytoken.svc’ Channel: ‘Microsoft.IdentityModel.Protocols.WSTrust.IWSTrustChannelContract’ Action: ‘http://docs.oasis-open.org/ws-sx/ws-trust/200512/RST/Issue’ MessageId: ‘urn:uuid:41e822d8-9b0f-4a48-93a2-003eaf92c8dc’
Leaving Monitored Scope (Build the X509Chain.). Execution Time=168,6921
Leaving Monitored Scope (SPCertificateValidator.Validate). Execution Time=168,7904
SecurityTokenServiceSendRequest: RemoteAddress: ‘
http://localhost:32843/SecurityTokenServiceApplication/securitytoken.svc’ Channel: ‘Microsoft.IdentityModel.Protocols.WSTrust.IWSTrustChannelContract’ Action: ‘http://docs.oasis-open.org/ws-sx/ws-trust/200512/RST/Issue’ MessageId: ‘urn:uuid:e3155df3-9409-4d5a-9391-bf938f9b7007’
Initializing Import.
SecurityTokenServiceSendRequest: RemoteAddress: ‘
http://localhost:32843/SecurityTokenServiceApplication/securitytoken.svc’ Channel: ‘Microsoft.IdentityModel.Protocols.WSTrust.IWSTrustChannelContract’ Action: ‘http://docs.oasis-open.org/ws-sx/ws-trust/200512/RST/Issue’ MessageId: ‘urn:uuid:953853ec-af7a-4100-91f8-b49533a7a986’
<nativehr>0x81070266</nativehr><nativestack></nativestack>Failure writing to target file
SPRequest.ExtractFilesFromCabinet: UserPrincipalName=i:0).w|s-1-5-21-3634847118-1559816030-2180994487-3194, AppPrincipalName= ,bstrTempDirectory=C:\Users\pholpar\AppData\Local\Temp\2\48463715-4bf7-4ca6-8aa1-3b92128d6789 ,bstrCabFileLocation=E:\Data\ListExport.cmp
System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException: <nativehr>0x81070266</nativehr><nativestack></nativestack>Failure writing to target file, StackTrace:    at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.<>c__DisplayClass5.<RunWithElevatedPrivileges>b__3()     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Utilities.SecurityContext.RunAsProcess(CodeToRunElevated secureCode)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(WaitCallback secureCode, Object param)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(CodeToRunElevated secureCode)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Deployment.ImportDataFileManager.Uncompress(SPRequest request)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Deployment.SPImport.Run()     at Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell.SPCmdletImportWeb.InternalProcessRecord()     at Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell.S…
…PCmdlet.ProcessRecord()     at System.Management.Automation.CommandProcessor.ProcessRecord()     at System.Management.Automation.CommandProcessorBase.DoExecute()     at System.Management.Automation.Internal.PipelineProcessor.SynchronousExecuteEnumerate(Object input, Hashtable errorResults, Boolean enumerate)     at System.Management.Automation.PipelineOps.InvokePipeline(Object input, Boolean ignoreInput, CommandParameterInternal[][] pipeElements, CommandBaseAst[] pipeElementAsts, CommandRedirection[][] commandRedirections, FunctionContext funcContext)     at System.Management.Automation.Interpreter.ActionCallInstruction`6.Run(InterpretedFrame frame)     at System.Management.Automation.Interpreter.EnterTryCatchFinallyInstruction.Run(InterpretedFrame frame)     at System.Management.Automatio…
…n.Interpreter.EnterTryCatchFinallyInstruction.Run(InterpretedFrame frame)     at System.Management.Automation.Interpreter.Interpreter.Run(InterpretedFrame frame)     at System.Management.Automation.Interpreter.LightLambda.RunVoid1[T0](T0 arg0)     at System.Management.Automation.DlrScriptCommandProcessor.RunClause(Action`1 clause, Object dollarUnderbar, Object inputToProcess)     at System.Management.Automation.CommandProcessorBase.DoComplete()     at System.Management.Automation.Internal.PipelineProcessor.DoCompleteCore(CommandProcessorBase commandRequestingUpstreamCommandsToStop)     at System.Management.Automation.Internal.PipelineProcessor.SynchronousExecuteEnumerate(Object input, Hashtable errorResults, Boolean enumerate)     at System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.LocalPipeline.Inv…
…okeHelper()     at System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.LocalPipeline.InvokeThreadProc()     at System.Management.Automation.Runspaces.PipelineThread.WorkerProc()     at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.RunInternal(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state, Boolean preserveSyncCtx)     at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state, Boolean preserveSyncCtx)     at System.Threading.ExecutionContext.Run(ExecutionContext executionContext, ContextCallback callback, Object state)     at System.Threading.ThreadHelper.ThreadStart() 
Failure writing to target file
Failed to read package file.  *** Inner exception:  Failure writing to target file
Import did not complete.
Microsoft.SharePoint.SPException: Failed to read package file. —> Microsoft.SharePoint.SPException: Failure writing to target file —> System.Runtime.InteropServices.COMException: <nativehr>0x81070266</nativehr><nativestack></nativestack>Failure writing to target file     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Library.SPRequestInternalClass.ExtractFilesFromCabinet(String bstrTempDirectory, String bstrCabFileLocation)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Library.SPRequest.ExtractFilesFromCabinet(String bstrTempDirectory, String bstrCabFileLocation)     — End of inner exception stack trace —     at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPGlobal.HandleComException(COMException comEx)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Library.SPRequest.ExtractFilesFromCabinet(String bstrTempDirectory, String bstrCabFileLocation)     at Microsoft.Sha…
…rePoint.SPSecurity.<>c__DisplayClass5.<RunWithElevatedPrivileges>b__3()     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Utilities.SecurityContext.RunAsProcess(CodeToRunElevated secureCode)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(WaitCallback secureCode, Object param)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.SPSecurity.RunWithElevatedPrivileges(CodeToRunElevated secureCode)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Deployment.ImportDataFileManager.Uncompress(SPRequest request)     — End of inner exception stack trace —     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Deployment.ImportDataFileManager.Uncompress(SPRequest request)     at Microsoft.SharePoint.Deployment.SPImport.Run()     at Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell.SPCmdletImportWeb.InternalProcessRecord()     at Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell.SPCmdlet.ProcessRecord()
Error Category: InvalidData    Target Object  Microsoft.SharePoint.PowerShell.SPCmdletImportWeb  Details  NULL  RecommendedAction NULL
Leaving ProcessRecord Method of Import-SPWeb.
Entering EndProcessing Method of Import-SPWeb.
Leaving EndProcessing Method of Import-SPWeb.

Searching for the error code and text on the web, I found this (not SharePoint-related) forum entry, with a bit more descriptive error text “Failure writing to the target file. Please check that you have enough disk space.”, that led me to the rather trivial solution: the C: drive was full, so the process was not able to create a temporary folder by extracting the .cmp file (that is actually a .cab file).

Note 1: As you see at the top of the post, the Import-SPWeb cmdlet was executed from the path C:\Users\pholpar. It does not help however,if you simply change the path to an other drive that has more place, as a temporary folder in the user profile (located in our case on the C: drive) is used to extract the files, see the value of the bstrTempDirectory parameter in the ULS logs above.

Note 2: It does help however, if you create and restore the backup file using the NoFileCompression switch of the Import-SPWeb / Export-SPWeb cmdlets, as in this case there is no need for the extraction process and the temporary folder mentioned above.

The ideal solution is of course, to keep your servers clean and healthy, providing always enough resources (including but not limited to disk space and memory) to fulfill their tasks.

June 25, 2017

How to get the Url of the “Edit View” Page of a Specific SharePoint List View from PowerShell

Filed under: PowerShell, SP 2013, Tips & Tricks — Tags: , , — Peter Holpar @ 07:33

There might be cases when you can’t access the Edit View page of a specific list view from the SharePoint UI. For example, there is no such direct link in the case of Survey lists. There is no ribbon including the Manage Views group, and the Views area is missing from the List settings page as well.

You can, however access the Edit View page from your browser if you know its URL. The standard URL of this page has this pattern:

http://YourSharePoint/Web/SubWeb/_layouts/15/ViewEdit.aspx?List=%7BDC913804%2DB28E%2D4F52%2DAF53%2DDEC490A1C83D%7D&View=%7B2E7DF707%2D42BA%2D44EE%2D87C6%2D0919CA38BDF1%7D

As you see, the ViewEdit.aspx page is responsible for this functionality. The encoded Ids (Guid) of the List and the View are passed as query string parameters (List and View respectively).

You can get the URL of the page using this PowerShell script easily:

$web = Get-SPWeb ‘http://YourSharePoint/Web/SubWeb&#8217;
$list = $web.Lists[‘YourList’]
# get the default view of the list
$view = $list.DefaultView
# or get an arbitrary view by its name
# $view = $list.Views[‘All Items’]
$viewId = $view.ID

function EscapeGuid($guid)
{
  return "{$guid}".ToUpper().Replace(‘-‘, ‘%2D’).Replace(‘{‘, ‘%7B’).Replace(‘}’, ‘%7D’)
}

$url = $web.Url + ‘/_layouts/15/ViewEdit.aspx?List=’ + (EscapeGuid $list.ID) + ‘&View=’ + (EscapeGuid $view.ID)

You can even start the page in Internet Explorer from PowerShell if you wish:

$ie = New-Object -ComObject InternetExplorer.Application
$ie.Navigate2($url)
$ie.Visible = $true

May 12, 2017

Getting a List of Checked-Out Projects from PowerShell via REST

Filed under: PowerShell, Project Server, REST — Tags: , , — Peter Holpar @ 05:22

We have an application running as a monthly scheduled batch process that updates enterprise fields of projects on our Project Server implementation based on values taken from various satellite systems. As a prerequisite, all affected projects should be checked-in. Projects checked-out to users won’t be updated. Of course, technically it would be possible to force check-in on those projects, but it was a business decision not to do that as we wanted to avoid data inconsistency by checking in a project that is not yet meant to be ready for that by the project manager.

Our application iterates through the projects, and if they are checked-in, it checks them out, updates the values, checks the project back and publishes it. If the project is checked-out, it sends a warning to the owner that the project was not updated due to its state. Occasionally project owners are doubting this warning, saying they are sure to check-in their projects, so I decided to create a sort-of report running just before starting the updating process to prove the list of projects left checked-out. It is something similar administrators already have on the Force Check-in Enterprise Objects page under PWA Settings.

image

Recently I wrote about how we can use PowerShell to create simple reports based on the data we query via the REST interface. This time I applied the very same technique to get the list of projects that are checked-out, including the name of the projects, the check-out description, checked-out time and the name and e-mail address of the user checked-out the project. The key was to assemble the REST query URL, including the $expand expression for the CheckedOutBy field.

$url = ‘http://YourProjectServerPWA/_api/ProjectServer/Projects?$expand=CheckedOutBy&$select=Name,CheckOutDescription,CheckedOutDate,CheckedOutBy/Title,CheckedOutBy/Email&$filter=IsCheckedOut’

$request = [System.Net.WebRequest]::Create($url)
$request.UseDefaultCredentials = $true
$request.Accept = ‘application/json;odata=verbose’

$response = $request.GetResponse()
$reader = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader $response.GetResponseStream()
$data = $reader.ReadToEnd()

$result = ConvertFrom-Json -InputObject $data

$result.d.results | % {
select -Input $_ -Prop `
    @{ Name=’Name’; Expression={$_.Name} },
    @{ Name=’User’; Expression={$_.CheckedOutBy.Title} },
    @{ Name=’EMail’; Expression={$_.CheckedOutBy.Email} },
    @{ Name=’Date’; Expression={[DateTime]::Parse($_.CheckedOutDate).ToString(‘g’)} },
    @{ Name=’Description’; Expression={$_.CheckOutDescription} }
    } | Export-Csv -Path CheckedOutProjects.csv -Delimiter ";" -Encoding UTF8 –NoTypeInformation

The result is a comma separated value (.csv) file, that one can open in Excel easily as well.

Disabling SharePoint Alerts Temporarily for a Specific SharePoint List

Filed under: Alerts, PowerShell, SP 2013 — Tags: , , — Peter Holpar @ 05:16

Recently we extended a SharePoint list in our test environment with a few new fields. Users have been complained that they received immediate notifications due to their existing subscriptions on the list. To avoid the same situation in the live system, we decided to temporarily deactivate the alerts for the time of the list field extension. I find a solution for that in this thread, implemented in C#. Although I like C#, for administrative tasks like this one I prefer using PowerShell, so I transformed the code into a few-line script:

$url = ‘http://YourSharePoint/WebSite&#8217;
$listTitle = ‘Title of your list’
$targetStatus = [Microsoft.SharePoint.SPAlertStatus]::Off # or [Microsoft.SharePoint.SPAlertStatus]::On

$web = Get-SPWeb $url
$list = $web.Lists[$listTitle]

# to query the current status of the alerts only:
# $web.Alerts | ? { $_.List.ID -eq $list.ID } | % { $_.Status }

$web.Alerts | ? { $_.List.ID -eq $list.ID } | % {
  $_.Status = $targetStatus
  $_.Update()
}

After implementing the changes, you can reactivate the alerts (in this case you should use the value [Microsoft.SharePoint.SPAlertStatus]::On in $targetStatus), however, you should wait a few minutes, as the immediate alerts are sent every 5 minutes by default (see screenshot below). If you turn the alerts on before the next run of the job, your previous change to inactivate the notifications has no effect and the alerts would be sent to the user.

image

By letting the Immediate Alerts job to have a run after you make the changes in the list, the notification events waiting in the event queue will be purged and not included in the upcoming immediate alerts. They will be however included in the daily and weekly summaries, but that was not an issue in our case.

If you don’t want to wait for the next scheduled run, you can start the job from the UI (see Run Now button above), or via script like this:

Get-SPTimerJob | ? { $_.Name -eq "job-immediate-alerts"} | % { Start-SPTimerJob $_ }

March 29, 2017

Working with the REST / OData Interface from PowerShell

Filed under: OData, PowerShell, REST, SP 2013 — Tags: , , , — Peter Holpar @ 20:56

If you follow my blog you might already know that I am not a big fan of the REST / OData interface. I prefer using the client object model. However there are cases, when REST provides a simple (or even the only available) solution.

For example, we are working a lot with PowerShell. If you are working with SharePoint on the client side at a customer, and you are not allowed to install / download / copy the assemblies for the managed client object model (CSOM), you have a problem.

Some possible reasons (you should know, that the SharePoint Server 2013 Client Components SDK is available to download as an .msi, or you can get the assemblies directly from an on-premise SharePoint installation):

  • You might have no internet access, so you cannot download anything from the web.
  • If you happen to have internet access, you are typically not allowed to install such things without administrator permissions on the PC. It’s quite rare case, if you or the business user you are working with has this permission.
  • You have no direct access on the SharePoint server, so you cannot copy the assemblies from it.
  • You are not allowed to use your own memory stick (or other storage device) to copy the assemblies from it.
  • Even if there is no technical barrier, company policies might still prohibit you using external software components like the CSOM assemblies.

In this case, using the REST interface is a reasonable choice. You can have a quick overview of the REST-based list operations here.

The main questions I try to answer in this post:

  • Which object should I use to send the request?
  • How to authenticate my request?
  • How to build up the payload for the request?

First of all, I suggest you to read this post to learn some possible pitfalls when working with REST URLs from PowerShell and how to avoid them with escaping.

Reading data with the SharePoint REST interface

Reading data with a GET request

Sending a GET request for a REST-based service in PowerShell is not really a challenge, might you think, and you are right, it is really straightforward most of the cases. But take the following example, listing the Id and Title fields of items in a list:

$listTitle = "YourList"
$url = "http://YourSharePoint/_api/Web/Lists/GetByTitle(&#8216;$listTitle‘)/Items?`$select=Id,Title"

$request = [System.Net.WebRequest]::Create($url)
$request.UseDefaultCredentials = $true
$request.Accept = ‘application/json;odata=verbose’

$response = $request.GetResponse()
$reader = New-Object System.IO.StreamReader $response.GetResponseStream()
# ConvertFrom-Json : Cannot convert the Json string because a dictionary converted from it contains duplicated keys ‘Id’ and ‘ID’.
#$response = $reader.ReadToEnd()
$response = $reader.ReadToEnd() -creplace ‘"ID":’, ‘"DummyId":’

$result = ConvertFrom-Json -InputObject $response
$result.d.results | select Id, Title

If you would use

$response = $reader.ReadToEnd()

instead of

$response = $reader.ReadToEnd() -creplace ‘"ID":’, ‘"DummyId":’

then you became this exception, when trying to convert the JSON response:

ConvertFrom-Json : Cannot convert the Json string because a dictionary converted from it contains duplicated keys ‘Id’ and ‘ID’.

The reason, that the JSON response of the server contains the fields Id and ID. JSON is case-sensitive, but PowerShell is not, so it is an issue if you want to convert the JSON response to a PowerShell object. You can read more about it in this post, although I don’t like the solution proposed there. Although it really helps to avoid the error, but it uses the case insensitive replace operator instead of the case sensitive creplace, so it converts both fields into a dummy field. PowerShell seems to have no problem with the duplicated properties.

Instead of using a System.Net.WebRequest object, we can achieve a shorter version using the Invoke-RestMethod cmdlet. Note, that we don’t select and display the Id property in this case to avoid complications. See my comments about that in the next section discussing the POST request.

$listTitle = "YourList"
$url = "http://YourSharePoint/_api/Web/Lists/GetByTitle(&#8216;$listTitle‘)/Items?`$select=Title"
$headers = @{ ‘Accept’ = ‘application/json; odata=verbose’}
$result = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $url -Method Get -Headers $headers -UseDefaultCredentials
$result.d.results | select Title

Reading data with a POST request

There are cases when you have to use the POST method instead of GET to read some data from SharePoint. For example, if you need to filter the items via a CAML query. In the following example I show you how to query the file names all documents in a library recursively that are older than a threshold value:

$listTitle = "YourDocuments"
$offsetDays = -30

$urlBase = "http://YourSharePointSite/&quot;
$urlAuth = $urlBase +"_api/ContextInfo"
$url = $urlBase + "_api/Web/Lists/GetByTitle(‘$listTitle’)/GetItems?`$select=FileLeafRef"

$viewXml = "<View Scope=’Recursive’><ViewFields><FieldRef Name=’Created’/><FieldRef Name=’FileLeafRef’/></ViewFields><Query><Where><Lt><FieldRef Name=’Created’ /><Value Type=’DateTime’><Today OffsetDays=’$offsetDays’ /></Value></Lt></Where></Query></View>"

$queryPayload = @{ 
                   ‘query’ = @{
                          ‘__metadata’ = @{ ‘type’ = ‘SP.CamlQuery’ };                      
                          ‘ViewXml’ = $viewXml
                   }
                 } | ConvertTo-Json

# authentication
$auth = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $urlAuth -Method Post -UseDefaultCredentials
$digestValue = $auth.GetContextWebInformation.FormDigestValue

# the actual request
$headers = @{ ‘X-RequestDigest’ = $digestValue; ‘Accept’ = ‘application/json; odata=verbose’ }
$result = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $url -Method Post -Body $queryPayload -ContentType ‘application/json; odata=verbose’ -Headers $headers –UseDefaultCredentials

# displaying results
$result.d.results | select FileLeafRef

Just for the case of comparison I include the same payload in JavaScript format:

var queryPayload = {
                     ‘query’ : {
                        
‘__metadata’ : { ‘type’ : ‘SP.CamlQuery’ },
                         ‘ViewXml’ : viewXml
                    
}
                   };

As you can see, these are the most relevant differences in the format we need in PowerShell:

  • We use an equal sign ( = ) instead of  ( : ) to separate the name and its value.
  • We use a semicolon ( ; ) instead of the comma ( , ) to separate object fields.
  • We need a leading at sign ( @ ) before the curly braces ( { ).

The Invoke-RestMethod tries to automatically convert the response to the corresponding object based on the content type of the response. If it is an XML response (see the authentication part above) then the result will be a XmlDocument. If it is a JSON response then the result will be a PSCustomObject representing the structure of the response. However, if the response can not be converted, it remains a single String.

For example, if we don’t limit the fields we need in response via the $select query option:

$url = $urlBase + "_api/Web/Lists/GetByTitle(‘$listTitle’)/GetItems"

then the response includes the fields Id and ID again. In this case we should remove one of these fields using the technique illustrated above with the simple GET request, before we try to convert the response via the ConvertFrom-Json cmdlet.

Note: If you still use PowerShell v3.0 you get this error message when you invoke Invoke-RestMethod setting the Accept header:

Invoke-RestMethod : The ‘Accept’ header must be modified using the appropriate property or method.
Parameter name: name

So if it is possible, you should consider upgrading to PowerShell v4.0. Otherwise, you can use the workaround suggested in this forum thread, where you can read more about the issue as well.

If you are not sure, which version you have, you can use $PSVersionTable.PSVersion to query the version number, or another option as suggested here.

Creating objects

In this case we send a request with the POST method to the server. The following code snippet shows, how you can create a new custom list:

$listTitle = "YourList"

$urlBase = "http://YourSharePoint/&quot;
$urlAuth = $urlBase +"_api/ContextInfo"
$url = $urlBase + "_api/Web/Lists"

$queryPayload = @{ 
                    ‘__metadata’ = @{ ‘type’ = ‘SP.List’ }; ‘AllowContentTypes’ = $true; ‘BaseTemplate’ = 100;
                    ‘ContentTypesEnabled’ = $true; ‘Description’ = ‘Your list description’; ‘Title’ = $listTitle                      
    } | ConvertTo-Json

$auth = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $urlAuth -Method Post -UseDefaultCredentials
$digestValue = $auth.GetContextWebInformation.FormDigestValue

$headers = @{ ‘X-RequestDigest’ = $digestValue; ‘Accept’ = ‘application/json; odata=verbose’ }

$result = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $url -Method Post -Body $queryPayload -ContentType ‘application/json; odata=verbose’ -Headers $headers –UseDefaultCredentials

The response we receive in the $result variable contains the properties of the list we just created. For example, the Id (GUID) of the list is available as $result.d.Id.

Updating objects

In this case we send a request with the POST method to the server and set the X-HTTP-Method header to MERGE. The following code snippet shows, how to change the title of the list we created in the previous step:

$listTitle = "YourList"

$urlBase = "http://YourSharePoint/&quot;
$urlAuth = $urlBase +"_api/ContextInfo"
$url = $urlBase + "_api/Web/Lists/GetByTitle(‘$listTitle’)"

$queryPayload = @{ 
                    ‘__metadata’ = @{ ‘type’ = ‘SP.List’ }; ‘Title’ = ‘YourListNewTitle’                      
    } | ConvertTo-Json

$auth = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $urlAuth -Method Post -UseDefaultCredentials
$digestValue = $auth.GetContextWebInformation.FormDigestValue

$headers = @{ ‘X-RequestDigest’ = $digestValue; ‘Accept’ = ‘application/json; odata=verbose’; ‘IF-MATCH’ = ‘*‘; ‘X-HTTP-Method’ = ‘MERGE’ }

$result = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $url -Method Post -Body $queryPayload -ContentType ‘application/json; odata=verbose’ -Headers $headers –UseDefaultCredentials

Deleting objects

In this case we send a request with the POST method to the server and set the X-HTTP-Method header to DELETE. The following code snippet shows, how you can delete a list item:

$listTitle = "YourList"

$urlBase = "http://YourSharePoint/&quot;
$urlAuth = $urlBase +"_api/ContextInfo"
$url = $urlBase + "_api/Web/Lists/GetByTitle(‘$listTitle’)/Items(1)"

# authentication
$auth = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $urlAuth -Method Post -UseDefaultCredentials
$digestValue = $auth.GetContextWebInformation.FormDigestValue

# the actual request
$headers = @{ ‘X-RequestDigest’ = $digestValue; ‘IF-MATCH’ = ‘*’; ‘X-HTTP-Method’ = ‘DELETE’ }
$result = Invoke-RestMethod -Uri $url -Method Post -Headers $headers -UseDefaultCredentials

Note: Although the documentation states, that “in the case of recyclable objects, such as lists, files, and list items, this results in a Recycle operation”, based on my tests it is false, as the objects got really deleted.

Final Note: This one applies to all of the operations discussed in the post. If the SharePoint site you are working with available via HTTPS and there is an issue with the certificate, you can turn off the certificate validation, although it is not recommended in a production environment. You should include this line in your code before making any web requests:

[System.Net.ServicePointManager]::ServerCertificateValidationCallback = { $true }

March 26, 2017

Generating Pseudo GUIDs for Your Project Server Entities

Filed under: PowerShell, Project Server, Tips & Tricks — Tags: , , — Peter Holpar @ 06:24

As you might have known, since the version 2013, Project Server utilizes pseudo-GUIDs to improve Project Server performance. These ones has the format of a “classical” GUID, but actually generated sequentially. As Microsoft states in this TechNet article:

"We handle GUIDs a little better in Project Server 2013 – and in many places they are sequential GUIDs which cause less index fragmentation"

This topic is quite good described in the Project Conference 2014 presentation Project Worst Practice – Learning from other peoples mistakes by Brian Smith. See the video recording between 6:08-13:54, or the slides 10-14.

One of the main components of the pseudo-GUID generation is the NewSequentialUid method of the Microsoft.Office.Project.Server.Library.PSUtility class:

public static Guid NewSequentialUid() 

  Guid guid; 
  if (NativeMethods.UuidCreateSequential(out guid) != 0) 
    return Guid.NewGuid(); 
  byte[] b = guid.ToByteArray(); 
  Array.Reverse((Array) b, 0, 4); 
  Array.Reverse((Array) b, 4, 2); 
  Array.Reverse((Array) b, 6, 2); 
  return new Guid(b); 
}

So if you want to use the same kind of pseudo-GUIDs for your own custom entities you create from code, you can get the IDs by invoking the method (for example, via PowerShell). The code sample below illustrates, how to get a single ID, or a batch of  IDs (in this case, 5 of them):

# load the necessary assembly
[System.Reflection.Assembly]::LoadWithPartialName("Microsoft.Office.Project.Shared")
# generate a single sequential ID
[Microsoft.Office.Project.Server.Library.PSUtility]::NewSequentialUid()
# or generate a range of sequential IDs, in this case, five of them
(1..5) | % { [Microsoft.Office.Project.Server.Library.PSUtility]::NewSequentialUid().Guid }

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